The winner of the 2016 eVolo Magazine Skyscraper Competition turns New York's Central Park into a sunken natural refuge lined with a mixed-use development.
Yitan Sun and Jianshi Wu via eVolo Magazine The winner of the 2016 eVolo Magazine Skyscraper Competition turns New York's Central Park into a sunken natural refuge lined with a mixed-use development.

Architecture isn’t short on plans for building tall—from the practical to the downright zany. The annual Skyscraper Competition from eVolo Magazine, which has been held since 2006, never fails to provide on both accounts. This year’s entrants took on a host of environmental and spatial challenges, using the competition’s focus on conceptual designs to rethink the fundamental nature of our fixation with building up. This, as the glut of supertalls on the boards and under construction is pushing many in the industry to scale back their thinking. The competition's winner does that, and then some. Rather than building up, the winning pitch from a pair of U.S.-based designers digs down to the bedrock, replacing New York's Central Park with a basin rife with natural life (shown above) and enclosed in a mixed-use development complete with housing and views of the sunken park. Conceived as a contrast to the built up urban landscape, the pit is filled with ponds, rolling hills and valleys, and grassy fields. “The re-imagined parkland would allow for hiking, climbing and other outdoor activities,” Gizmag reports. The winner was chosen by a jury from a pool of nearly 500 submissions. The second and third place winners propose, respectively, turning 432 Park Ave in New York into a control tower and docking station for small drones, and building a massive data server tower in Iceland, where the cool climate would reduce energy demands. [Gizmag + eVolo]

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